Pu-erh Tuo Cha Tea

Pu-erh Tuo Cha Tea
Share |

Pu-erh Tuo Cha Tea

Avg. Customer Rating:
4.5 stars
(8 Reviews)
                      
Reviews
5 star:
5 star
()
4 star:
4 star
()
3 star:
3 star
()
2 star:
2 star
()
1 star:
1 star
()
      • Search Terms:
        • pu-erh
        • caffeinated
        • loose leaf
        • exotic
        • bold
        • full-bodied
        • complex
      • generic_text_1: http://www.stashtea.com/info/Brewing_Guide@Our Guide to Brewing Tea
      • generic_text_2: http://www.stashtea.com/info/Tea_Types@Tea 101: Tea Types
      • generic_text_3: http://www.stashtea.com/info/FAQ@Tea FAQ
      • generic_text_7:  
Price:
$6.00 - $11.50

Prices vary by options selected.

Buy Box
  1. Size guide
  2. Availability:
    In Stock
  3. Availability:
    Select a size for availability.
Item No.
P050131
      • Search Terms:
        • pu-erh
        • caffeinated
        • loose leaf
        • exotic
        • bold
        • full-bodied
        • complex
Learn & Explore
Product Videos
Shipping Cost
Order Sub-Total Standard
3-8 Business Days
Second Day
2-3 Business Days
Next Day
1-2 Business Days
Up to $15.00 $4.95$19.45$35.45
$15.01 - $24.99 $4.95$23.95$43.45
$25.00 - $50.00 $7.95$27.95$48.45
$50.01 - $74.99 $7.95$31.95$53.45
$75.00 - $100.00 $9.95$36.95$62.45
$100.01 - $150.00$9.95$42.95$69.45
$150.01 - $200.00$9.95$49.95$76.45
$200.01 - $250.00$9.95$54.95$83.45
Over $250 $9.95$59.95$90.95

Product Details

Pu-erh Tuo Cha's leaves have been hand-formed into the shape of tiny bowls or tuo cha ("birds nests") and individually wrapped. This tea brews a reddish cup with a mild and slightly sweet earthy flavor.

Pu-erh, known in old Chinese as "black tea", is tea that is actually fermented. Depending on which type of pu-erh is being manufactured, the leaf may or may not oxidize; however, microbial activity involving several different bacteria does take place both in and on the leaf. The particularly large leaves can be either oxidized ("cooked") or nonoxidized ("raw"). Pu-erh can be loose-leaf or compressed into the traditional round cakes (known as bing cha) and other interesting shapes, such as mushrooms, spheres, cubes, pyramids, coins and more. The leaves can also be infused several times.

The large leaves used in the manufacture of highest-quality pu-erh are plucked from the long-lived tea bushes that grow abundantly in southern Yunnan Province. The leaf used to make both cooked and raw pu-erh cakes is sun-dried leaf from the local tea trees. To achieve the distinctive flavor and aroma of pu-erh, the tea is heaped into piles and a controlled amount of moisture is introduced to the leaves. As the bacterial process begins to affect the nature of the tea, the piles are carefully turned and monitored as heat begins to generate within the pile. The heat combined with moisture encourages the natural bacterial fermentation integral to the tea's character and flavor.

  • Cups to Grams:
    • 8 grams makes 3-4 cups
    • 25 grams makes 10-15 cups
    • 50 grams makes 20-25 cups
    • 100 grams makes 45-50 cups
    • 1 pound loose makes 180-200 cups
  • Ingredients: pu-erh tea
  • Steeping Instructions: 2-5 minutes at 190-209 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Caffeinated: Yes
  • Country of Origin: China
Customer Reviews

Show last 3 reviews |

Write your own review

Average customer rating
4.5 stars
(8 customer reviews)
5 star:
5 star
(6)
4 star:
4 star
(0)
3 star:
3 star
(1)
2 star:
2 star
(1)
1 star:
1 star
(0)

1 out of 1 people found the following review helpful:

5 stars
New guilty pleasure
December 7, 2013
Reviewer:  Tim L 

(So Cal)

 - See all my reviews
This stuff is _really_ good. I'm a fan of the Irish breakfast tea, and this is really good too. Get a french press and you can make about 4 teas with each load of leaves. Damn you, Stash!

Was this review helpful to you?

1 out of 1 people found the following review helpful:

5 stars
Fan of Pu'erh
February 19, 2013
Reviewer:  Royster "R. Faina" 

(University of Wyoming)

 - See all my reviews
Pu'erh, like Scotch whiskey, is one of those beverages either people will love or not. I have enjoyed "Stash" teas for quite some time and love that they carry Chinese teas! I would like to see STASH give a tip on brewing pu'erh tea. Bring water to boil, turn off heat, pour this over the tea leaves in your cup (put a Tou Cha in a ball tea strainer for convenience) and allow the pu'erh to soak for 30 seconds then pour the water totally out. Pour water over leaves in cup, steep to desired strength. Enjoy! This is an old process the Chinese call, "Washing the Tea". A good Pu'erh will never get bitter no matter how strong it is brewed. Oh, one more thing; Pu'erh does reduce blood cholesterol due to the bacterial process produces statin compounds. So if you are taking statin drugs consult your Dr. before starting this tea.

Was this review helpful to you?

1 out of 1 people found the following review helpful:

2 stars
Not for everyone
September 5, 2012
Reviewer:  White Wolf 

(Texas)

 - See all my reviews
This was my first time trying a Pu-erh tea. I thought I would be adventourous after reading the other comments here...

Experiences may varry and tastes may differ between the different varients of Pu-erh but the first thing I noticed about the tea was the "earthy" aroma. This was not a bad smell by any means but unfortunately reminded me a little too much of all the time I have spent in an Ag. Barn in my youth.

Ignoring the aroma, the taste was not bad and had some interresting nuances to it but was just not appetising to me.

Being open-minded, I attempted to acclimate my tastebuds to the flavor but after the fourth or fifth cup I found my self liking it less and less. It also had a linguring after-taste that only time could deminish.

Overall, I had to give it 2 stars because it appeared to be of good quality and it fufilled my desire to try a Pu-erh tea.

I would encourage anyone to try new teas - if you don't like them, don't drink them, but always keep an open mind.

Was this review helpful to you?

2 out of 2 people found the following review helpful:

5 stars
Unexpected!
February 14, 2012
Reviewer:  Jene D. "Jene D." 

(Geneseo, IL)

 - See all my reviews
I've never tried a Pu-erh tea before and didn't know what to expect. It kinda has a fishy taste. After several pots the taste grows on ya, and now it is one of my favorite teas!

Was this review helpful to you?

1 out of 1 people found the following review helpful:

5 stars
I love this tea!
January 21, 2012
Reviewer:  Christie Holland 

(The Region)

 - See all my reviews
I love the rich russet color of the brew and the way the earthy flavor lingers in my mouth after the sip. The scent and flavor are very earthy and organic-tasting, but not overpoweringly so. Very smooth and nary a bitter note to be found, even if you let it over brew a bit.

The second infusion is my favorite.

Was this review helpful to you?

1 out of 1 people found the following review helpful:

5 stars
Lovely
August 19, 2011
Reviewer:  Archived Review 

(Portland, OR)

 - See all my reviews
I love this tea. I know that a lot of people have some trouble with the flavor of Pu-Erh teas, but once you get used to it, it's almost addicting. I find the small cha cakes to be an excellent method of delivery and are very easy to use for brewing. No measuring, just pop a cha into your tea pot. Good for at least 2 infusions.

Was this review helpful to you?

1 out of 1 people found the following review helpful:

5 stars
Lives up to its Billing
August 12, 2011
Reviewer:  Archived Review 

(Portland, OR)

 - See all my reviews
Pu-Erh is one of the most unusual of teas, and the tuo-cha form is particularly tricky to use. But if you get it right, there is nothing like it. The secret is to use an open-top infuser with a lid and to break off just the right amount of the "bird's nest." Half of one ball is just about right for a large, 12-oz mug, while a cup or small mug will require much less. Use boiling water and infuse for three minutes. A second infusion of 4 or 4 1/2 minutes will produce a tea that is almost as strong. The tea feels a little thick and heavy, but it settles on the palate and stomach very comfortably. In China it is recommended as a digestif, and it certainly fulfills that role very well. I prefer the first infusion, taken with a little milk. My wife prefers the slightly lighter second infusion (which also is almost caffeine-free) and drinks it without milk. Both are wonderfully soothing after supper. Take the time to prepare this tea the right way, and you will be well rewarded.

Was this review helpful to you?

1 out of 1 people found the following review helpful:

3 stars
Good...for the price.
August 11, 2011
Reviewer:  Archived Review 

(Portland, OR)

 - See all my reviews
This is not my favorite pu-erh by a long shot, but as a tea to have on hand, especially for anyone looking to be a little adventurous in their tea tastings, it's good as an example.

Was this review helpful to you?